~ 062009 Imaging Study Confirms Citicoline Boosts Mental Function

NewsRx.com

A recent study out of McLean Hospital, an affiliate of Harvard Medical School, confirms that Cognizin® Citicoline, a dietary supplement composed of a powerful natural anti-aging compound, that has been shown to support the improvement of brain function by promoting neural and cognitive performance, will be presented at this year's International Society of Sports Nutrition Annual Conference in New Orleans by Dr. Deborah Yurgelun-Todd on Tuesday, June 16, 2009. The International Society of Sports Nutrition is the only non-profit academic society dedicated to promoting the science and application of evidence-based sports nutrition and supplementation (see also Kyowa Hakko).

The study, entitled "Citicoline Enhances Frontal Lobe Bioenergetics as Measured by Phosphorus Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy," was published in the Journal of NMR in BioMedicine (Vol 21, Issue 10, Dec 2008, 1066-1075). The citicoline used in the study is manufactured by Kyowa Hakko, an international health ingredients manufacturer, using a proprietary formula under the brand name Cognizin®.

Several prior studies of Cognizin® Citicoline, as well as this one conducted at McLean Hospital, a Harvard Medical School affiliate in early 2008 and presented at the Society for Neuroscience's 37th Annual Meeting, demonstrated the supplement's effectiveness in providing essential structural components for synthesizing brain cell membranes and helping subjects maintain normal cognitive function as they age. It achieves these results by increasing the production of several neurotransmitters in the central nervous system, including acetylcholine, norepinephrine and dopamine.

In the study, 16 subjects were randomly chosen to receive 500 mg and 2000 mg daily of Cognizin® Citicoline for six weeks. The benefits observed were quantified by sophisticated brain imaging techniques, which showed healthy middle-aged adults had increased energy and electrical activity in the frontal lobe of the brain - the portion of the brain that controls higher thought, decision making and focus. The new study is more specific than earlier studies about citicoline's beneficial effect on the brain. It also appears to forge a stronger link than ever between nutrition and cognitive function, a relationship that has often been discounted in the past.

"This most recent study confirms previous research and bolsters our conviction that citicoline, taken at a minimum dosage of 500 mg each day, is a simple and natural nutrient for your brain that may help you feel better, think more clearly, sleep better, increase your memory and improve your overall quality of life," said Perry Renshaw, M.D., Ph.D. Director of Magnetic Resonance Imaging, The Brain Institute of the University of Utah, Professor of Psychiatry, University of Utah School of Medicine and a pioneer in research on the compound.

Dr. Deborah Yurgelun-Todd, Director of Cognitive Neuroimaging at the Brain Institute of the University of Utah and Professor of Psychiatry, was the lead investigator of the study. "We're excited about some of the ancillary benefits we're seeing that have implications for improved attention, increased energy and even weight loss in our subjects," says Dr. Yurgelun-Todd. "We were very selective about the form of citicoline that we used in our study. We looked at several forms and delivery systems of citicoline, and we ultimately used Cognizin® Citicoline because of its purity and consistent quality. We cannot stand behind other forms of citicoline, as we have not tested their quality and purity," Dr. Yurgelun-Todd ends.

Citicoline is a generic name for supplemental CDP-choline, a natural substance found in all living cells. In human health, CDP-choline plays important roles in the formation of cell membranes and in supporting healthy brain function. Citicoline is sometimes called a "brain nutrient" because of its roles in supporting cognition and memory. To learn more, please go to: http://www.cognizin.com/.

Keywords: Kyowa Hakko, Biomedicine, Biomedical Engineering, Biotechnology, Bioengineering, Surgery, Spectroscopy, Alternative Medicine, Therapy, Treatment, Dopamine Hydrochloride, Pharmaceuticals, Drugs, Magnetic Resonance, Bioenergetics, Neuroscience, Aging.

This article was prepared by Surgery Litigation & Law Weekly editors from staff and other reports. Copyright 2009, Surgery Litigation & Law Weekly via NewsRx.com.

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